Battered Buffet

Oh how I have been in search of a buffet to paint!!

I finally found this set in an online auction and was pretty excited about the possibilities. The tricky thing about an online auction is you rarely have the opportunity to see the pieces live and “kick the tires”…it’s all reliant on photos.

image

In this case the photos didn’t really show the whole picture, and it’s even difficult to see in the photos I have posted here.  The wood veneer on the china cabinet is, in fact, more gorgeous than these photos reveal.  And I mean in a “holy cow no one should ever put paint on that beautiful wood” kind of way.

 

 

The buffet had, however been quite battered, including chipped veneer, poorly applied ancient shellac, and structural cracks.  Perfect for Paint!!!

image

Luckily I was able to find a home for the china cabinet with someone who was as in love with the wood as I was and planned on sprucing up only the interior with some color. Whew!

First step after washing and scuff sanding was to remove the doors, drawers and hardware.  After that it was on with stripping the old finish off the scratched and stained top to see what condition the wood was underneath.

A few coats of Citristrip later and it looked pretty good with the exception of some character-building dings and a single light burn mark from a hot dish.  That helped to make the decision for a dark stain on top to blend in the burn.  Here’s how it looked after two applications of Minwax Jacobean stain and a several thin layers of Polycrylic Matte for a topcoat.

 

 

image

 

 

For the body, I started with a good cleaning with TSP, light sanding and scrub with some odorless mineral spirits to remove any residual wax.  A few repairs here and there (and everywhere…) – including repairing the top finish after some precariously stacked boards in the overstuffed garage were accidentally knocked onto the curing finish…yes, a variety of words were said.

A base coat of FUSION Concealer helped to solidify coverage for the first coat of FUSION Raw Silk.  It only took two coats of Raw Silk to get great coverage overall.  I used a microfiber roller on the flat spots and my go-to angled 2 inch flat brush for the rest.  I was EXHAUSTED after working the flat brush into all of those curves on the legs…and I still missed a bunch of spots.  This strategy was Not going to work.

Enter Staalmeester!

I had a set of Staalmeester brushes I have been wanting to try out, but frankly didn’t anticipate being wowed by any cutting edge paintbrush advances…I mean, it’s just a paintbrush, right?

Folks have been buzzing about how great the pointed sash brush is for getting into nooks and crannies, so I decided to give it a try since it couldn’t get worse than what I did with the flat brush!

H-O-L-Y    C-O-W   was I totally Wowed!!!!

The #18 pointed sash brush at the very bottom if the picture became my new favorite tool.  It slid effortlessly into all of those nooks, held tons of paint, and laid down a smooth, even layer of paint in half the time it took me to attempt the base coat.

I will Never paint curves again without it!!!

After that valuable lesson, I have lightly distressed and partially antiqued this piece.  I also reassembled the buffet and painted a few coats of concealer inside the cabinets and Chocolate inside the badly beaten drawers.  Here’s a peek at the progress so far…

image

 There is much more finishing work to be done  – MORE TO COME!!!

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s